Archive for the ‘shower’ Tag

A Weird New Goal of Zero Bottles in the Shower   Leave a comment

Not very long ago I was looking at my bottles on the shelf in the shower and realized that I don’t actually think I need any of them. For a long time I’ve been on a slow progression of simplifying my personal care routines (not that I was ever the stereotypical 20-bottles in the shower/over an hour to get ready in the morning woman), and it seems like I’ve reached a point where most of the rest of my products just seem pointless.

When I say slow progression, I do mean that. This story starts over a decade and a half ago, when I stopped shampooing my hair every day and switched to every other day. Over the years that became more like a couple times a week, then once a week. Then a few years ago I decided to try going shampoo free, using the baking soda and apple cider vinegar method. I had to switch back to washing my hair every time I showered (which was so hard as I had gotten so lazy about washing my hair!). Then gradually I was able to BS/ACV my hair only a couple times a week, and then weekly, while just rinsing with water in between. I’ve now reached a point where I don’t actually remember when I last used the BS/ACV, so I’m guessing I use it a couple times a year or so. When I last cleaned the shelf in the shower I realized that there’s really no reason for me to be keeping bottles of the baking soda and apple cider vinegar solutions in the shower, as I can easily mix up “single serve” batches when I feel like using them. Plus then I can customize the essential oil blends mixed in if I feel I need anything. I’ve also got a bottle of conditioner from back in my shampooing days, which I only use after getting a hair cut to make it up to my hair and restore a coating on the follicles. It’s going to take me another decade to finish that bottle, but there’s no reason it can’t join the extra bottle of shampoo for guests in the hall bathroom. So hair care: 0 bottles, 1 natural bristle brush.

The next simplification was a couple years ago when Conan was born. In the days/weeks after his birth I could find the time to splash my face with cold water every day, but not to use the cream cleanser that I’ve been using for years. After a while I realized that not using a cleanser and/or warm water on my face was not causing any breakouts. So why keep buying/using a cleanser? Then I started wondering if I really needed a moisturizer, and found that even my dry skin doesn’t generally demand a moisturizer if I’m only rinsing with cold water. At that point I started wondering about using oil, not a commercial moisturizer. Shockingly, when I switched to using grape seed oil on my face after showers (i.e. rinsing my face with warm water), I didn’t start breaking out. So facial care: 1 small jar of grape seed oil (the bottle lives in the kitchen for cooking), 1 facial brush.

The only thing left in the shower is the shave gel. I wax my legs, so it’s just for my underarms. Now I want to find out if we really do need special shave products as opposed to soap to shave. I suspect that it may be true for those who shave daily, and for legs, but for underarms that get shaved 2-3 times a week I suspect soap will be fine long term. If true that would mean shaving: 0 bottles, 1 razor.

Don’t worry, I’m keeping the soap.

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Posted February 21, 2015 by mayakey in frugal living, goals, personal care, simple living, unshopping

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Chloroform-Free Showers   1 comment

I got a nice surprise this weekend when we went to the hardware store to get grass seed. While we were there I figured we could swing by the showerheads and find out if they have any filters for chlorine. Filtering the shower for chlorine is something that has been on my pre-pregnancy list that I’ve been dreading because I hate shopping. I figured that we would end up going through several showerheads in an attempt to find one that would satisfy both my husbands desire for good spray and my desire for low flow and chlorine filtration. In order to rule out “easy” I wanted to check Lowe’s to verify that there are no “easy” chlorine filtering showerheads available. Guess what? I was wrong! Yay!

Backing up a bit, you might be wondering why I want to filter chlorine out of the shower water. You might be wondering what chlorine is doing in the water in the first place. Well, the chlorine is there because it has to be. Water agencies/companies are required to maintain a certain concentration of free chlorine in the water all the way to your tap. The purpose: health. Chlorine is a disinfectant. Even now that many water agencies are switching to other less toxic/dangerous primary disinfection methods, they still need to add chlorine so that the water remains clean all the way to the tap. That’s all well and good, but when we heat the water up for a warm/hot shower, that chlorine volatilizes. I remember that in the human exposures class I took in grad school we¬†did the calculation for how much chloroform we are exposed to during a hot shower, and I remember being astounded by the answer. On top of the inhalation of chlorine vapors, our skin absorbs a lot of chlorine when immersed in water as well.¬†Looking back over my course notes, I found a peer reviewed article about chloroform that mentions a study that calculated 40 micrograms of chloroform inhaled and another 40 micrograms absorbed through the skin during a 10 minute shower.

Doing some post-purchase research into the chlorine-filtering showerhead that we bought, it does not work like a carbon filter that adsorbs the chlorine, but it works through a chemical reaction (a redox reaction) to convert the free and combined chlorine into chloride, which does not vaporize and apparently doesn’t get readily absorbed by the skin (I’m not positive about that, though). I’m assuming that most showerhead chlorine filters will use something like this rather than the bulky slow carbon filters that you would put on a sink faucet. According to their website, the filter media can be disposed of easily by dumping it on the dirt in your yard or garden, and then the filter cartridge is recyclable. That’s pretty cool. It’s a 2.5 gallons per minute showerhead, so it doesn’t really qualify as low-flow, though. I still need to actually measure the flow rate to verify. In any case, the showerhead that it is replacing is one of those rain style showerheads that use a lot of water. Oh, and it was cheap, only $26.

All in all, this was an awesome surprise. Pros: chlorine filtration, no long difficult shopping process, cheap, disposal by compost and recycling, and my husband is happy with the spray. Cons: not really low-flow, and packaged in a plastic clamshell. When we get around to dealing with the other bathroom, I might get a separate chlorine filter so that we can also have a low flow shower head. We’ll see.

Posted October 13, 2010 by mayakey in home, personal care, pre-pregnancy, water use

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