The Rediscovery of The Spray Feature   Leave a comment

As I’ve now mentioned here a couple of times, we just had to replace our kitchen faucet in order to fix a leak in the supply line. It was one of the few easy purchases in life because (1) no real research was required and (2) the plumber supplied the new faucet. I take that back about the research since I’m doing it retroactively as I write this post. Before the purchase I assumed that there are no faucets made in the US, and that the lead content in the faucets wouldn’t vary much. We perused the aisles at Home Depot and Lowe’s to get a feel for the cost of replacing our faucet with something similar, and that was the extent of my research. I wanted to talk to the plumber about the choices for water efficiency. It turns out it is a very good thing that we got the faucet through the plumber, because otherwise we probably would have made what I would later consider “a bad decision.”

The first thing that came up was that some manufacturers responded to California’s reduction of allowed lead in faucets/piping/etc from 8% to 0.25% by switching from metal to plastic faucets. If we had bought the faucet on our own we probably would have bought a plastic faucet without even realizing it, since those would be the slightly cheaper ones. But there is a much higher risk of contaminants leaching out of plastic compared to metal, just based on the molecular structures. And metal is recyclable in perpetuity, whereas plastic is usually not recyclable and can usually only be recycled once if at all. It is important to consider the entire lifecycle of a product, and that includes disposal.

After the faucet had been installed I rediscovered the spray feature, which we would not have gotten if we had bought the faucet ourselves. It has been so many years since I had a kitchen faucet with the spray/stream selection that I had completely forgotten it. When we perused the hardware store aisle we looked at the buttons on the sprayers for some of the faucets and decided that we just wanted something simple: no buttons that will break. The faucet that the plumber supplied had the buttons, though he insisted that they won’t break. After he left I played around with the new faucet and I tried the buttons. It was a head-slapping moment. One is the pause button, and the other is the spray/stream toggle. We can now save water in the kitchen! Yay!

Using the spray feature is great for washing-type tasks because it reduces the water use. By the rules of physics, forcing the water through the smaller spray holes means higher velocity of water. So for the same velocity of water coming out of the faucet, less total flow (volume) is required for spray vs. stream. Since high water velocity is what you need when washing/rinsing things, using spray requires less total water flow than stream. With the toggle switch it is easy to switch to stream for tasks that require water volume, like filling a glass or a pot.

Now we just have to get used to not having to pull the handle out quite as far.

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Posted January 20, 2011 by mayakey in conscious living, home, water use

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