Conscious Kitchen Challenge, Produce   3 comments

One of the blogs that I read regularly, Ask An Organic Mom, is doing a conscious kitchen challenge to promote her new book. I’m taking the challenge and posting my results here. The first week was a self-exam, the second was about shopping, and the third is about fruits and vegetables. I haven’t read her book, so the challenge is limited to what she posted in her blog.

This challenge is about buying organic produce, and locally grown produce. To a certain degree I jumped the gun in the last post about shopping. Since we already shop weekly at a year-round farmer’s market, I challenged myself to start asking questions about the pest management practices of the venders. Some of them are organic farmers and I buy their goods, but most of them don’t say anything on their signs. It will be a little awkward, after 5 years of buying from the same people, to finally ask if they spray and with what pesticides.

The most popular guide to help knowing what to buy organically and what not to buy conventionally is pesticide ranking list by the Environmental Working Group (EWG’s Dirty Dozen and Clean 15). Many people use the list for financial reasons and only buy the dirty dozen organically. I prefer to buy everything organic if I can find it, and just not buy the worst offenders at all if I can’t find them organically grown. I heartily encourage everyone to consider buying at least a the worst offenders organically (peaches, apples, bell peppers, celery, nectarines, strawberries, cherries, kale, lettuce, imported grapes, carrots, and pears). Also consider that waxed cucumbers may have pesticide residue trapped under the wax so that it cannot be washed off.

I put a slightly greater weight on buying from the farmer’s market vendors than buying local produce at the grocery story. I’ve heard that pretty much all major grocery stores that buy local produce practice a kind of predatory contracting with small farmers where they put pressure on the farmer to reduce costs and sometimes at the last minute decline to renew contracts, leaving a farmer with no where to send their bounty. Hence, I try to avoid buying produce at the grocery store (I acknowledge that this is a luxury enjoyed only by those of us who live in areas where year-round farming is possible). On a regular basis the only thing I buy at the grocery store is russets because we don’t get them consistently at our farmer’s market. My husband also buys bananas and packs of baby carrots. If for some reason we were not able to go to the farmer’s market any given week, then we typically buy what produce we need at Whole Foods, making sure to get domestic organic vegetables.

As far as exotics go, as I said before my husband does buy bananas each week. I rarely enjoy a banana, mango, or pineapple since they are obviously not to be found in our farmer’s market and I have personally committed to eating seasonal/”local”. When we do have to buy our produce at Whole Foods, I actually tend to buy the exotics because I figure if I have to shop that week at the grocery store I might as well get something I can only get at the grocery store.

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Posted April 24, 2010 by mayakey in food, organic

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